Archive for the ‘Holidays’ Category

Women’s Health Articles

Tuesday, April 14th, 2015

Dr. Katz is quoted on occasion in Women’s Health magazine articles – most recently on “jumpstarting” your diet.   Earlier, in January, she contributed to the dialogue on resolutions.

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TOOLS, IDEAS, AND INSPIRATION: Eat More Sanely in 2014

Friday, January 3rd, 2014

 

Just as surely as December brings candy and and egg nog, January brings weight loss plans.  If you’ve followed my previous years’ resolution blogs (see the Holidays archive), you know that I lean toward the one or two small changes that stick.  The overhaul-everything-January-1st approach doesn’t boast a good success rate, after all.  This year, I’ve noticed more of a trend in the popular press toward that favored idea:  focus on eating more vegetables, for instance, or improving your breakfast.  Here I round up some of the most helpful articles I’ve seen recently:

On eating more vegetables  Here’s a change that allows you add, rather than cut down.  Eating more vegetables can improve your health, whatever happens weight-wise, and tends to help a lot in the weight department, too.  These articles may ease your way to those additional servings daily:
*
Eat Two Pounds of Vegetables (Rule #1)
   *Healthy Habit #1:  Eat 3 More Veggie Servings Each Day
   *Sustainable Resolutions
     *Vegetables:  More and More and More!

And/or nuts!  Research backs what many nutritionists and diet coaches have long promoted—nuts may be high in calories, but a little goes a long way in terms of keeping you full and ultimately eating less.
*Are Nuts a Weight Loss Aid?

On learning portion control  We Americans tend toward very large food portions.  It takes effort, and time to get used to and satisfied with, more moderate ones.  These articles offer helpful strategies for getting that process going:
*
The Power of Portion Control
    *What’s Your Portion Personality (10/13 issue, Cooking Light, Nutrition Made Easy, by Phillip Rhodes) (more…)

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Holiday Damage Control: It’s That Time Again

Thursday, November 21st, 2013

 Maybe you’ve worked really hard to lose weight this year.  Maybe you’ve started eating better, no matter what your weight.  Maybe it’s been on-again/off-again, but you’re pushing for more “on-again”.  No matter what, this is the “perfect storm” season for backtracking:  lots of tempting food, everywhere.  Stress, family pressures, too much to do.   More alcohol, less sleep.  Routines out of whack.   It’s hard to avoid setback, yet so rewarding when setback’s at least minimized.  January 1st comes soon and hard enough without 10 pounds to lose.

To help you through, check out these links, to the Eat Sanely holiday archives  (note especially “The Joys of Just Maintaining“), and to our favorite help-you-through-the-holidays articles from.   Some of this support hones specifically on the holiday overloads; some can serve you well all year long. (more…)

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Counting More Than Calories: Factoring in months and years

Wednesday, October 30th, 2013

As we near our most weight-challenging season, I think about those who manage to navigate without gaining a “holiday seven”…..especially, those who now move through the feasts and parties and candies and dips without regaining.  There’s useful advice to be found in the media, on planning ahead, lightening traditional foods, taming stress.   A factor often neglected in weight discussions, though, is time.  Those who make lasting habit changes usually have come to appreciate the role of time.  And this sticks with them throughout even the challenging periods.

In contrast to lose-it-quick dieters, people who grasp the time factor might note something like, “It’s taken me 27 years to put the pounds on…..I guess it might take two to get if off.”   Whether they know it or not, they’re confirming the idea that “change is a process”.  And that time-limited dieting will never lead to the kind of day-in, day-out, year-in, year-out, habits and attitudes that maintain thinner physiques. (more…)

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NEW YEARS RESOLUTIONS THAT STICK….AND TEN SMALL CHANGES THAT COUNT

Monday, January 2nd, 2012

It’s a fresh start….it feels great….but I’m afraid I won’t keep it up…. I’ve heard these words, or something like them, a lot this week. So, I start this new year with thoughts on our resolutions to eat well, lose weight, or otherwise improve our diet habits.

New Year’s diet resolutions usually fizzle quickly. The goals we set may be too broad and sweeping, too out of touch with reality to last. They don’t factor in the inevitable complications and challenges. They don’t consider whether or not we’re really prepared or ready. Grand resolutions—say, to eat every day in a way that keeps weight down, for good, forever, period—require understanding and preparation. I’ll return to those in my next blog. Here, I offer some ideas for smaller resolutions.

Those who follow my blogs will know that I believe in the power of small changes (related blogs listed below). Changing one or two specific habits may or may not lead immediately to lost pounds. They open the door to other and bigger changes, though. And they usually have value in themselves, however they affect the scale in the short run. Perhaps most important now, they’re likely to stick. They’re less likely to fizzle out in two weeks. So they’ll leave you feeling confident about your ability to make future changes. (more…)

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THE JOYS OF JUST MAINTAINING

Tuesday, November 22nd, 2011

I reprint a post here that suits the season….

As a therapist, you tend to see less joy and fun this time of year than worry and strain. Yes, it’s a biased outlook, but the stresses of the season are certainly real. People trying to keep their health and weight in check, especially, face a daunting array of triggers and challenges. Many simply say, “Forget it!” and let go of goals and good self-care for weeks.

If you’ve followed this blog, you’ll know that I don’t think “forgetting about it” makes sense—for a lot of reasons. On the other hand, neither does striving for perfection. One idea I’ve discussed with many clients this season is that of “just maintaining”. That is, if you’re working to lose weight, and/or to change your habits for the better, this may not be the best time for full-steam ahead progress. After all, most of us will confront some potent combination of parties, extra tasks and running around, family pressures, and of course all those cookies, candies, special drinks, etc.

If you aim to “just maintain”, though, you won’t need to view this stretch in all-or-nothing terms. In other words, you’ll discern something in between the extremes of resisting everything vs. letting go of all your hopes and progress. This will most likely mean picking and choosing the events you attend, the foods you go for, the types of things you cook or contribute. It might mean carving out exercise time even while life and schedule get crazy. (more…)

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THE FOREVER DIET (New Year’s Resolutions That Stick, Part 2)

Monday, January 24th, 2011

 As we near January’s end, some remain strong in their new diet resolutions, feeling pretty good about that.  Some work away at that “one small change” or two.  Others have forgotten how very much they wanted to change on January 1st.  And still others suffer in frustration as they can’t seem to stick with a plan.

When diet resolutions sour this early, it usually points to a lack of preparation.  Changing habits at any time of year calls for a thorough review of where you want to go, with anticipation of setbacks.  If you always give up your diet when you get bored with your routine–or when you get too busy, or when your family wants pizza—why would this time be different?

Usually lacking, too, when efforts break down quickly, is a realistic idea of how change happens.   Major changes require a lot of repetition and practice.  They don’t  happen perfectly all at once. 

With weight loss, it’s particularly important to realistically prepare for the long run.  On-again/off-again diets can lower metabolism and build discouragement:  both of which lead to greater future weight gain.  Better to get ready, then, and make changes that can last, than to jump in and out of diets, losing quickly, maybe, and then regaining at least as quickly again.  Aiming for a total lifestyle change, rather than weight loss that won’t hold up, pays off in a body that stays lean.  People often say they know this, but then another short-sighted diet seems just the thing. 

How to make the lasting change really happen?  I repeat here the basic framework for setting on the path to sane eating (look through the blog archive and the EatSanely.com “Resources” for more help along your way: (more…)

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HAS YOUR NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION FIZZLED YET? Thoughts on sticking with them, reviving them

Wednesday, January 12th, 2011

 

As promised, I’ll be returning to the subject of New Year’s diet resolutions, and how to make them stick, in my next eatsanely.com blog.  Here are some related thoughts posted today at Thin From Within:

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/thin-within

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SPEAK UP TO KEEP WEIGHT DOWN: For the Holidays and Beyond

Thursday, November 4th, 2010

 As we near the holiday season—and its inevitable challenges to sane eating and weight control—I’m highlighting the importance of speaking up.  For stating your needs and preferences becomes especially important in the holiday push to join in, avoid making waves, and keep others happy.   It’s not that joining in and making others happy is bad.  It can lead to the abandonment of self-care, though, and of course to regained weight.  And for this we often end up feeling pretty unhappy ourselves.

Speaking up can prove hard at times, perhaps especially in this season.   I offer here some quick reading resources to help you get through these weeks feeling good about how you’ve cared for yourself, with some emphasis on the “speaking up” part.

 Eat Sanely blogposts:
11/23/09 (“The Best Holiday Gift:  No Weight Gain”)
12/22/09 (“The Joys of ‘Just Maintaining’”)
Click on “Older Entries”, below

Thin From Within blogpost: 
11/4/10 (“Assertiveness and Eating Better:  Speaking Up to Manage Your Weight”)
http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/thin-within

Other articles: 
“Avoiding the Holiday Spread,” Suzette Glasner-Edwards, O the Oprah Magazine, 12/08
www.oprah.com/health/How-to-Avoid-Holiday-Weight-Gain

“4 Ways to Put Your Diet First,” Suzette Glasner-Edwards, oprah.com., 11/08
www.oprah.com/health/4-Ways-to-Put-Your-Diet-First

“Caring for Yourself at Thanksgiving,” A.F. Hutchinson, mybiglife.com, 11/08
http://mybiglife.com/emotional-weight/288-caring-for-yourself-at-thanksgiving.html


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THE JOYS OF JUST MAINTAINING

Tuesday, December 22nd, 2009

As a therapist, you tend to see less joy and fun this time of year than worry and strain. Yes, it’s a biased outlook, but the stresses of the season are certainly real. People trying to keep their health and weight in check, especially, face a daunting array of triggers and challenges. Many simply say, “Forget it!” and let go of goals and good self-care for weeks.

If you’ve followed this blog (see 11/23/09 post), you’ll know that I don’t think “forgetting about it” makes sense—for a lot of reasons. On the other hand, neither does striving for perfection. One idea I’ve discussed with many clients this season is that of “just maintaining”. That is, if you’re working to lose weight, and/or to change your habits for the better, this may not be the best time for full-steam ahead progress. After all, most of us will confront some potent combination of parties, extra tasks and running around, family pressures, and of course all those cookies, candies, special drinks, etc.

If you aim to “just maintain”, though, you won’t need to view this stretch in all-or-nothing terms. In other words, you’ll discern something in between the extremes of resisting everything vs. letting go of all your hopes and progress. This will most likely mean picking and choosing the events you attend, the foods you go for, the types of things you cook or contribute. It might mean carving out exercise time even while life and schedule get crazy.

You might even think of this “just maintain” time as an opportunity to experiment with one new behavior, however small, that could yield interesting results….or that could make future holiday seasons a bit less stressful. For example, try some “assertive dieting” techniques with your family (see references below for more help with that….) On a (maybe easier!) note, you could try some 5- or 10-minute exercise “bites” (also see references) at work. Or, you could simply make a less fattening version of one favored food. (more…)

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