Archive for the ‘Kids’ Category

Talking to Kids About Food

Thursday, October 16th, 2014

What Should Children Eat? Asks this year’s Food Issue of the New York Times Sunday magazine. The issue explores how to get kids to eat more adventurously, what kids around the world eat for breakfast (not always sweetened cereal….), and more. In our heightened concern with healthy food and eating practices, looking at how our children relate to food makes sense. I add to the discussion here by reprinting an article on how to talk to kids about food—what encourages better choices, what instills too much fear?

Share

More on Feeding Kids

Wednesday, September 4th, 2013

From time to time Eat Sanely highlights the ways that home cooking helps our health, our weight, our “eating sanity” overall.   The following link came to my attention recently:  “30 of the Best Blogs with Healthy Breakfast Recipes for the Whole Family“.   Starting off the day well can set the tone for better eating throughout the day.  And no matter how the day goes, the good start is never truly in vain.   I hope you find some inspiration and ideas!

Share

On Building Healthy Eating Habits

Friday, May 24th, 2013

Once again, I direct my readers’ attention to an article of interest:  How to Promote Healthy Eating Habits in Young Children.   Of course, we’re always working on developing and keeping up our own good habits….but how much easier when they’re solid to start with!

 

Share

Avoiding Emotional Overeating When Your Kids Are Driving You Crazy….

Tuesday, February 5th, 2013

I recently found this post on the LiveInNanny blog.  Its author echoes many of the points often made here, but with a specific focus on the overeating that follows frustrating times with kids.  I hope some of you find it helpful!

http://www.liveinnanny.com/blog/how-to-avoid-emotional-eating-when-you-have-kids-who-make-your-crazy/

Share

HELPING KIDS EAT HEALTHILY–AND WITHOUT FEAR

Monday, February 13th, 2012

I was again interviewed by the London Sunday Times, this time about helping to foster healthy attitudes in kids about eating and weight–and about not fostering fear and worry.  This is a complicated issue in our times.  Here is the link to the article, “But If I Eat This Will I Fit Into My Jeans?”:  kids-1

Check out the other entries in this “Kids” blog archive to read more on this important issue.

 

 

 

 

Share

MORE ON KIDS AND WEIGHT

Thursday, December 22nd, 2011

A version of “Talking to Kids About Weight” appeared on the Psychology Today blog Thin From Within (http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/thin-within)

One commentor sent information on a DVD, tip cards, discussion strategies, etc. available for parents to talk to kids on a host of health-related subjects.  This includes weight, eating disorders, and other topics that parents may feel at a loss to tackle.  In some cases, as with weight, parents may even fear  that talking will worsen things–“if I mention weight, she’ll feel bad….”, for instance.   As I stressed in my last blog, this need not be true.  However, what a help to have some concrete guidance.  Parents can indeed help kids care for themselves.  And they can help guide them toward healthier choosing.  Check out these resources at  http://www.wordscanwork.com

Good luck to all parents, kids, and families working to eat–and live–more sanely!

 

 

 

Share

TALKING TO KIDS ABOUT WEIGHT

Friday, December 16th, 2011

“But it’s so yummy, mummy…” begins an article by Eleanor Mills on the daunting task of steering kids toward healthy food and weight.  Mills explores, in the London Sunday Times and on her Fat Kittens blog (http://www.fattkittens.wordpress.com/2011/12/12/), how best to “tame your child’s weight.”  We’re pressed lately to halt the obesity epidemic among children, yet there’s little practical guidance on what parents can actually do in real life with kids.

On the one hand, we know mothers who’ll militate against birthday cupcakes in school.   At the same time, we still see an awful lot of Doritos and Sponge Bob Roll-Ups in the lunch kits.   Sometimes, you’re reluctant to admit that your kids refuse any whole wheat version of anything.  Other times, you feel rigid and bossy saying “no” to more cookies.  You don’t want to damage your child’s self-esteem by mentioning the chubbiness.  Yet you don’t want health or social problems to result.  What’s a parent to do? (more…)

Share